Prestige Property: 92 Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, NSW
Share Button

Prestige Property: 92 Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill, NSW

Expansive, elevated family living in a blue-ribbon location.

By Terry Christodoulou
Fri, Apr 30, 2021 4:18pmGrey Clock 2 min

A true entertainer’s dream, this newly complete home is a masterful study in modern luxury.

Here, in the sought-after address of Victoria Road, Bellevue Hill arrives a capacious, four-level, residence offering approximately 1000sqm of internal living space across 8-bedrooms, 9-bathrooms and a 6-car garage – with parking for a further three additional vehicles available on site.

Boasting flexible living and an elevated, contemporary palette driven by charcoal, chrome and white tones the Simon Hanson of Bureau SRH designed home offers elevated modern family living.

What is quickly decipherable is that no detail has been spared in the construction of the home, with a combination of Japanese tiling and European oak chevron parquetry underfoot, coupled with a professional gallery lighting system.

The ground floor sees the dining and living, which flows via floor-to-ceiling glass doors out to the landscaped gardens.

It’s here, a state of the art kitchen boasts integrated SubZero fridges, a Zip tap, Miele, Wolf and Ilve appliances arrives alongside a kitchenette.  

Throughout the home there is eight bedrooms, all complete with ensuites that see Kohler branded fixtures, book-matched marble and bespoke joinery.

The master bedroom is found on the first floor with an expensive dressing room and opulently decorated ensuite. Also on this floor is an exceptionally large home office.

The top floor sees a parents’ retreat, as well as a large rumpus area for relaxing. The basement is complete with an expansive entertaining room, complete with wine cellar and billiards table, alongside a bathroom. Here, floor-to-ceiling glass doors open the space out into the garage complete with automated turntable. The basement to the first floor is serviced by private lift.

Built to entertain, the home offers plenty to be enjoyed, with the outdoor area replete with an outdoor kitchen, mini putting green, basketball court, gym, sauna, outdoor shower and magnificent swimming pool.  

Further, the home is secured by CCTV, video intercom and code entry.

The residence is conveniently only moments Sydney’s most exclusive private schools, Bellevue Hill village, waterfront parks and Bondi Junction shopping and transport.

The listing is with D’Leanne Lewis (+61 419 676 667) of Laing+Simmons, Double Bay, EOI; lsdb.com.au



MOST POPULAR

What a quarter-million dollars gets you in the western capital.

Alexandre de Betak and his wife are focusing on their most personal project yet.

Related Stories
Lifestyle
Fashion’s Boring-and-Expensive Era Is Over
By JACOB GALLAGHER 19/06/2024
Lifestyle
Ozempic Fuels Hunt for Smaller Clothes
By SUZANNE KAPNER 17/06/2024
Property
I.M. Pei’s Son Speaks of His Father’s Legacy of Creating ‘Places for People’ Ahead of a Retrospective in Hong Kong
By ABBY SCHULTZ 12/06/2024

From Gucci to Valentino, designers have a new ethos: Fun

By JACOB GALLAGHER
Wed, Jun 19, 2024 3 min

Not long ago, designer Jonathan Anderson attended a music festival where he surveyed the crowd and thought, Now this is where all the fashion has been lurking.

“I saw more people dressing more in high fashion than actually what was happening in fashion,” said Anderson , who designs the British clothing brand JW Anderson, as well as LVMH’s Loewe.

The free expression of these festival goers stuck with Anderson as it clashed with the risk-shy attitude that has guided much of luxury fashion in recent years. “I wonder,” said Anderson this past weekend in Milan, “has fashion become so conservative whereas what’s happening out there is actually way more avant-garde?”

Just a couple of years ago in Milan, “quiet luxury” was on the tip of everyone’s tongue. This collocation was a simplistic shorthand for where fashion was going: pricey but prim; light on logos but heavy on the wallet; all cashmere everything in gray, beige, navy.

Fashion is a creative industry and designers can only cup their mouths for so long. At the latest edition of Milan men’s fashion week, shouts in the form of new, notice-me clothes broke out from the runways.

“People want uniqueness, maybe they want something which is challenging somehow,” said Anderson, speaking after the latest JW Anderson show, which was widely held up as the most successful collection of a muddled Milanese sprint.

Highlights included winsome cardigans with children’s book depictions of London terrace houses, leather jackets contorted by ski-slope-like hems and a kitschy sweater showing a smirking pint of Guinness—an upmarket riff on a Dublin tourist souvenir.

The day after Anderson’s show, came the surprise online release of a bulging 171-outfit lookbook from Valentino, the first stab from the label’s new creative director Alessandro Michele, who helped lift Gucci to a more than $10-billion brand before leaving in 2022.

At Gucci, Michele ushered in a maximalist fashion moment, and based on this initial showing, his taste for theatrics is intact. Against a backdrop of winter-mint curtains, feather-haired models (often wearing gigundo nerd glasses and hoops of pearls) sported floppy dog-ear ties, Kermit-green suits and tapestry prints. Flipping through the collection, all the tired but fitting Michele comparisons came rushing back: Wes Anderson films, kooky grandmothers and leopard-clad psych-rock bands.

Model on the runway at the Gucci fashion show during Milan Fashion Week Menswear Spring/Summer 2025 held at Triennale di Milano on June 17, 2024 in Milan, Italy. (Photo by Aitor Rosas Sune/WWD via Getty Images)

Valentino, which is part-owned by Kering, also made its commercial intentions clear by sending out 93 close-up photos spotlighting easy-to-buy accessories like V-logoed sandals and rectangular handbags.

Notably, Sabato de Sarno, the still newish creative director who replaced Michele at Gucci, seemed to be shrugging off his own restraints. Neither De Sarno nor François-Henri Pinault, CEO of Gucci parent company Kering, spoke to the press after the show, but the collection was a departure from the brand’s recent strategy of focusing on classic, trend-agnostic pieces that cater to older, wealthier clients.

De Sarno’s surf-inspired offering bounded between skin-revealing mesh polo shirts, skimpy thigh-high shorts and camp-collared shirts with blooming hibiscus flowers prints. It would be hard to imagine much of it on anyone over 29. (Actor Paul Mescal, 28, was already in the front row in a pair of those shorty shorts.)

Youthful abandon was the theme at Gucci’s mightiest Milanese competitor, Prada. “Sometimes when you get older you start to overthink a lot and you limit yourself,” said Raf Simons, who is co-creative of the brand with Miuccia Prada , the grand doyenne of Italian fashion. “When you are young, you just go. We like that spirit.”

Models wore navel-exposing shrunken sweaters and pre-wrinkled sportcoats, a seeming nod to teens who haven’t yet learned the wonders of ironing. A lurid palette of hot pink and electric blue spoke to juvenile fashion experimentation.

Throughout the long weekend in Milan, the feeling settled in that this new, shoutier tone was a necessary course correction during an unsteady period for the apparel industry, and really, Europe at large.

The chatter of the front row centred on this month’s European Union elections which saw a surge in support for right-wing candidates, catching pundits and leaders like French President Emmanuel Macron by surprise. Inflation also remains stubbornly high.

Pressingly, for the fashion world, some of the world’s largest luxury labels have been reporting a glut of unsold products and a dearth of shoppers. Past strategies don’t seem to be working and one could tell that brands were ready to try anything to spur shoppers to spend a bit more.

Even at Zegna, a label so synonymous with quiet luxury that the cast of “Succession” wore it on that money-mad show, the clothes were more conspicuous. In between its Learjet-bound sotto voce suits, one found vivacious coral patterned jackets in blue and yellow.

“For sure playing more with colors and prints, we had fun,” said Zegna’s artistic director Alessandro Sartori following his show. “It’s a sense of freedom that I wanted to express.”